Pregnancy and the Workplace

Whether you have had a baby,  are thinking about having a baby, or simply work with someone who has had a baby, pregnancy in the workplace can be a hot topic.  Just like employees, employers often do not know what they should or can do regarding an employee's pregnancy. This year, TYLA addressed these issues in two written guides: Pregnancy and the Workplace: Know Your Rights(for employees) and Pregnancy and the Workplace: Know Your Duties (for employers).  Both can be found on TYLA's Website. Additionally, TYLA Directors Raymond Baeza, Courtney Barksdale Perez, Baili Rhodes and Shannon White participated in two panel discussions for the 10 Minute Mentor Series.  The panel shared their experiences, and discussed applicable employment law. I encourage each of you to check out this series, and share with your employer clients (and your colleagues). #jointheconversation

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Keeping Stress in Check with Hobbies and Extracurricular Activities

It is easy to allow work to stress you out. Stress often manifests itself when burning the midnight oil; keeping clients and colleagues happy; and tackling other projects. As enjoyable as work may be, sometimes it’s nice to get away from the office and spend time with family and friends. With that said, I know I stress even more when sitting around the house. To deal with that stress and hopefully prevent it before it arises, I try to find activities that keep me busy outside of work.   When it comes to such extracurriculars, I find that I enjoy maintaining a diversity in activities. For instance, I really enjoy exercise. Check out my earlier Lawyers Who Lunch article, “Finding Time for Fitness,” from August 19, 2015. Fitness is critical to a healthy lifestyle and alleviating stress. Over the years, my fitness activities have changed. When I was in high…

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Learning to Say No

Young lawyers are constantly bombarded by partners, other young lawyers, friends, relatives, and members of their communities (business and charitable) to give more and more of their time to various projects, organizations, and work.   However, young attorneys easily over commit by simply saying “yes” to every activity that comes through the door. Being new to the profession, we want to impress others and show people what we are made of.   This article  sums up two major points of why saying “no” is important in your work life—why say “no” in the first place and why “no” isn’t a bad word.   “Because people are expected to be agreeable, you might think that saying ‘no’ means you’re being disagreeable. That’s not really the case: you’re just saying you can’t do what is being asked of you.” – Mark Wilson, Esq.  

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Finding Time for Fitness

As attorneys, we are busy: busy working; busy spending time with our families; busy serving others; and busy making friends. Unfortunately for us, we often overlook caring for ourselves. When we forget, a host of problems arise: depression, undesired weight gain, and loss of energy to name a few. As for undesired weight gain, it’s understandable that when expected to put everyone else first, we as attorneys might forget to feed ourselves nutritious meals or take time to workout. If that weren’t enough, we spend the majority of our time sitting at desks, where the only thing we exercise is bad posture. I propose we take time for ourselves, time to exercise. Exercise combats health conditions and diseases Exercise improves mood Exercise boosts energy Exercise promotes better sleep Exercise improves your sex life Exercise is fun Exercise boosts brainpower Exercise helps build relationships Exercise lets you eat more You probably…

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From the Guy’s Side: What is “Success”?

At my firm job, the path to “success” was well-defined. Bust your hump, bill a ton of hours, do good work, and after 8 or 9 or 10 years, you reach the brass ring that is partnership. After a couple of years on this track, though, my wife and I had our first child. I struggled with how best to reconcile my personal goal of spending as much quality time as possible with my growing family, with my professional goal of “succeeding” in a big firm. I did some soul searching, and I came out of it with a new, personal definition of “success.”

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